F&M Bank Donates $323,000 to Area Nonprofits in 2017

In 1908, the local farmers and businessmen who met to discuss the formation of F&M Bank held a vision for a monetary venture to serve their community. Much has changed since our humble beginnings, but one thing that remains constant is our heart for the community. This year, a total of $323,000 was donated to area nonprofits to help support their mission of providing worthwhile services to local residents in need of assistance.

In 1908, the local farmers and businessmen who met to discuss the formation of F&M Bank held a vision for a monetary venture to serve their community. Former President and CEO Dan Todd reinforced this vision in 1967 by making a commitment to stockholders to serve the community, and that was the standard F&M would live by. In 1968, the Board of Directors authorzied sending $2,000 to area nonprofits.

F&M Bank took pride in giving back to the community, and in the coming years the bank experienced great success. According to Nancy Bondurant Jones in her book Banking on the Future, A 100 Year History of Farmers & Merchants Bank, “the bank’s continuing growth had to be credited to its continuing community service.” Each year around Christmastime, F&M Bank made financial contributions to local charities and volunteer fire and rescue organizations. Carlton Melton, former head executive at Rockingham Memorial Hospital offered the following story.

“During our late 1980s fundraising campaign to build the cancer center, I solicited funds from all the banking institutions in the area. When I got to Farmers & Merchants to meet with Dan Todd, I figured since they were less affluent, I’d ask for only $10,000. When I did, Todd asked me what I’d asked the other banks. I confessed I’d asked them for $20,000. He said, ‘Well, we’ll do that if we can do it over three years’. Then, in December, he phones to say, ‘We’ve had a good year, can we pay it all now?’ That little bank in Timberville wouldn’t be outdone by anyone.”

Much has changed since our humble beginnings, but one thing that remains constant is our heart for the community. The spirit of giving that existed in the 1980s is still very much alive at F&M Bank. This year, a total of $323,000 was donated to area nonprofits to help support their mission of providing worthwhile services to local residents in need of assistance. As we continue to grow and experience success, we will never forget our commitment to the communities we serve.

Pictured: Kevin See, Broadway Fire Department with Mary Campbell, Broadway Assistant Branch Manager. On behalf of the bank, Mary presented a donation to the Broadway Fire Department at their annual dinner in December.

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Protect Yourself from Card Skimming at the Gas Pump

Recently, card skimming has been a hot topic in our area. There is a group of professional criminals placing skimmers on gas pumps along the 1-81 corridor. How can you protect yourself from the agony of a fraud claim? Here are our 6 best tips:

Recently, card skimming has been a hot topic in our area. There is a group of professional criminals placing skimmers on gas pumps along the 1-81 corridor.

F&M Bank has been in contact with the Secret Service in Richmond to help combat this issue and protect our customers. The Secret Service has shared the following information:

Skimmers are placed inside the gas pumps making detection near impossible. There is a Bluetooth device being plugged into the card reader on the inside of the pump that is capturing card and PIN numbers. The criminals have even created stickers that look legitimate in order to convince consumers that the gas pump is secure.

How can you protect yourself from the agony of a fraud claim? Here are our 6 best tips:

1) Pay for your gas inside the store. You will completely avoid the skimming device.

2) Do not use pumps located farthest away from the store. They are hardest for store employees to monitor and most likely to be targeted.

3) If you pay at the pump, ALWAYS run your card as credit. If you enter your PIN, the criminals then have the number which can lead to fraudulent ATM withdrawals and larger losses.

4) Sign up for transaction text alerts. Knowing each time your card is used can give you the power to shut down your card quickly if an unauthorized transaction comes through. We offer this service through our mobile app!

5) Be sure your card issuer has your current phone number and offers 24/7 fraud watch so that you can be contacted when suspicious activity takes place.

6) Finally, fraud losses are covered by the card issuer, and this offers some relief. It may take up to 10 days to get your money back, which is a financial hardship and can be stressful, but you will recover your losses!

We understand that fraud can be an extremely frustrating situation, that is why we’re offering these tips. Help us protect your money and be cautious when paying at the pump!

 

F&M Bank Corp. Board of Directors Appoints President

F&M Bank Corp. Board of Directors Appoints President
On December 1, 2017, the Board of Directors of F&M Bank Corp. (OTCQX: FMBM) named Mark C. Hanna as the new President of F&M Bank.

PRESS RELEASE: F&M Bank Corp. Board of Directors Appoints President

For Immediate Release

TIMBERVILLE, VA ‐‐ On December 1, 2017, the Board of Directors of F&M Bank Corp. (OTCQX: FMBM) named Mark C. Hanna as the new President of F&M Bank.

“The board and I are delighted to have Mark join our team,” said Ellen Fitzwater, F&M Bank Board Chairman, “we are confident that Mr. Hanna’s well-rounded banking experience will serve our customers, shareholders, and communities well, and we look forward to working alongside him during his transition.”

Mr. Hanna brings over 27 years of banking experience to the position, most recently as Tidewater Regional President for Eastern Virginia Bankshares and as President and Chief Executive Officer of Virginia Company Bank.

On his appointment, Mr. Hanna said, “I am excited and honored to take on this role. I look forward to joining the F&M family while continuing the tradition of investing in our communities and providing a best-in-class experience for our employees, shareholders, and customers.”
Mr. Hanna will be relocating to the F&M Bank market area along with his family and will work alongside current CEO, Dean Withers, and the F&M Bank Board for the next several months.

For more information, or comments from Mrs. Fitzwater, Mr. Withers, or Mr. Hanna, please email marketing@fmbankva.com or call (540) 217-6409.

About F&M Bank Corp.
F&M Bank Corp. operates as the holding company for F&M Bank, which provides commercial banking and financial services to individuals and businesses in Virginia. The company’s deposit products include interest bearing and noninterest bearing demand, savings, and time deposits, as well as money market accounts. It also offers residential mortgage and construction loans; consumer installment loans; commercial loans, such as agricultural loans; and credit card loans. The company also provides title insurance, brokerage services, and property/casualty insurance to its banking customers. F&M Bank Corp., through its other subsidiary, TEB Life Insurance Company, reinsures credit life, and accident and health insurance. F&M Bank operates locations in Rockingham County, Shenandoah County, Page County, Augusta County, and the Cities of Harrisonburg and Staunton, Virginia. The company was founded in 1908, is headquartered in Timberville, and is the only publicly traded corporation based in Rockingham County, VA.

About F&M Bank
F&M Bank serves the Shenandoah Valley with 13 full-service branches, a network of ATMs, and a wide variety of financial services. Both individuals and businesses find the organization’s local decision-making, and up-to-date technology provide the kind of responsive, knowledgeable, and reliable service that only a progressive community bank can. F&M Bank has grown to over $750 million in assets and boasts over 160 full and part-time employees. Its conservative approach to finances and sound investments, along with excellent customer service, has made F&M Bank profitable and continues to pave the way for a bright future.

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F&M Bank Christmas Party Employee Recognition

On Saturday, December 9th, 2017, F&M Bank held its annual Christmas Party, and several employees were honored for their years of service and dedication to F&M Bank.

On Saturday, December 9th, 2017, F&M Bank held its annual Christmas Party, and several employees were honored for their years of service and dedication to F&M Bank.

Forty-Five Years of Service

Larry Caplinger (pictured with Dean Withers).


Thirty-Five Years of Service

Chuck Foltz (pictured with Dean Withers).


Thirty Years of Service

Lynette Wine (pictured with Dean Withers).


Fifteen Years of Service

Kitty Purcell, Mary Campbell, Sharrie Harrison, and Vickie Wendt (pictured left to right with Dean Withers).


Ten Years of Service

Ann Kirtley, Krista Suter, Ed Strunk, Tammy Whitmire (pictured left to right with Dean Withers). Not pictured: Roberta Kagey, Sarah Prusak, and Sheila Reedy.


Five Years of Service

Jennifer Foltz (pictured with Dean Withers). Not pictured: Sherrill Beahm, Greg Berkshire, JT Bishop, Donna Brown, Gary Davenport, Jessica Hartman, Bonnie Harris, Ryan May, and Robin Miller.

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Harrisonburg and Rockingham County Relocation Guide

Relocating to Harrisonburg or greater Rockingham County? Get answers to your questions about where to live, how to get around, and what to do in your spare time!

Nestled in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley region of Virginia, between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains, Harrisonburg is two hours south of the DC metro area. This city of about 50,000 people, including the James Madison University community, offers the best of urban and country living in an affordable, relaxed environment. The weather stays fairly mild all year round and there is plenty to do, see, eat, and enjoy.

If you’re in the process of relocating to Harrisonburg, you probably have lots of questions about where to live, how to get around, and what to do in your spare time. As a community bank, F&M Bank loves all things local. We created this Harrisonburg Relocation Guide to help you with moving to Harrisonburg and to share our passion for this pleasant college town surrounded by the beauty of nature. If you’ve recently moved to Harrisonburg, you may have already discovered what longtime residents love about their “burg” including a lower-than-average cost-of-living, short commutes, and thriving economy. Here’s everything you need to know to get settled in town.

Harrisonburg is an independent city, but it’s also the county seat of Rockingham County. Nestled between the Allegheny and Blue Ridge Mountains, the Harrisonburg metro area of Rockingham County is rich with possibilities. From outdoor adventures to fine dining and arts and culture, you can find what you’re looking for here.

Cost of Living: Harrisonburg vs. Richmond and Alexandria

With a cost-of-living score of 96 (the national average is 100), Harrisonburg is a cheaper place to live than the country’s average. It’s also slightly more affordable than Richmond (97.5) and especially compared to Alexandria (156.2). Here’s what you can expect to spend on housing in these three Virginia cities:

  • Harrisonburg: Average monthly rents are $647 for a one-bedroom and $827 for a two-bedroom apartment. Buying a home is also quite affordable, with average sale prices in the low $200,000s.
  • Richmond: You’ll pay about $791/month to rent a one-bedroom apartment or about $916 for a two-bedroom. Median sale prices of homes vary by neighborhood but there is plenty available for under $200,000.
  • Alexandria: Average rents here are nearly double that of Harrisonburg and significantly higher than in Richmond. One-bedrooms go for around $1,300/month and a two-bedroom apartment will run you about $1,500/month. If you want to buy a home, you can find a condo for around $200,000 but most stand-alone houses go for between $500,000 and one million.

Where to live: Neighborhoods and Housing Stock

Harrisonburg offers a range of housing stock and neighborhoods, from recently converted downtown apartments to new suburban subdivisions. You can also find single-family homes in quiet and leafy neighborhoods close to James Madison University and downtown Harrisonburg. If you don’t need to be within city limits, there are many new developments of townhomes, duplexes, and detached houses just south of Harrisonburg in Rockingham. Here’s a sampling of Harrisonburg neighborhoods:

Map of Harrisonburg, Virginia

  • Beacon Hill: A townhome development in the Northeastern part of the city. Close to the Northend Greenway Project, a multi-use path and “corridor park” connecting different neighborhoods and parts of Harrisonburg.
  • Fairway Hills: A long-established neighborhood with a suburban feel in the Southern part of Harrisonburg. Close to Spotswood Country Club. Great for people who want a quieter lifestyle within city limits.
  • Greendale: An affordable neighborhood of smaller-sized single-family homes in a variety of styles. Close to JMU.
  • Harmony Heights: A newer development with a range of housing stock: townhomes, duplexes, and single family homes. This neighborhood features a lake to give you a more relaxed lifestyle in the city. Close to Eastern Mennonite University.
  • Liberty Square: Another townhome development on the Eastern side of Harrisonburg.
  • Old Town: This is Harrisonburg’s historic district. Enjoy a walkable urban lifestyle next to JMU and all that downtown Harrisburg has to offer. A great neighborhood for people who love old homes.
  • Pleasant Hill Acres: A family-friendly neighborhood where outside traffic is not permitted. The housing stock is from the 1950s and 60s with ranchers, split-levels, and other designs from that period. Close to JMU and downtown attractions.
  • Sunset Heights: Older single-family homes in the West Central part of Harrisonburg.

Primary and Higher Education in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County

JMU may be the biggest university in Harrisonburg, but it’s not the only institution of higher education. There are also public and private elementary and high schools for families with school-age children.

Harrisonburg City Public Schools

Harrisonburg High School serves the entire district. There are two middle schools and six elementary schools. In addition to traditional public schools, the district offers Great Oak Academy, a 6-8th grade non-traditional small program, and Massanutten Technical Center, with high school programs in a range of fields including auto technology, carpentry, cosmetology, electricity, practical nursing, welding and more.

Rockingham County Public Schools

Serving the rest of the county, RCPS consists of 15 elementary schools, 4 middle schools, and 4 high schools. There is also a governor’s school, a technical center, and an alternative education center.

Private Schools

Choose from private religious and secular schools with a variety of educational approaches:

Higher Education and Technical Training

Harrisonburg offers a wealth of educational opportunities beyond high school. In addition to the city’s three universities, Massanutten Technical Center has a variety of adult programs from GED classes to apprenticeships, practical nursing, and continuing education.

  • James Madison University is a state school with 124 undergraduate and graduate degree programs.
  • Eastern Mennonite University offers undergraduate, graduate, and seminary programs. Harrisonburg is their main location, but they also have a Lancaster, PA campus and an online program.
  • Bridgewater College Named one of the best liberal arts colleges in the southeast by Princeton Review. Bridgewater College is small, private and recognized for strong academics.

Getting Around Harrisonburg

Interstate 81 cuts through Harrisonburg and the city is connected to many state highways as well. Its small size makes it easy to get around Harrisonburg by car whether commuting to work or enjoying leisure activities in different neighborhoods. If you move to Harrisonburg from another state you’ll need to get a Virginia driver’s license, register your car and get Virginia license plates, and have your vehicle inspected at an approved local auto shop. You’ll also want to apply for a residential parking permit in your neighborhood. Permits cost $3.00 each per vehicle and come with two free guest cards. To receive a parking permit you must show proof of ownership or rental lease and valid registration.

The Harrisonburg Department of Public Transportation (HDPT) maintains six bus routes throughout the city. Compared to public transit systems in other cities, HDPT is a very affordable way to get around. The adult fare is $1.00; seniors age 62 and up pay $0.50, and students in the public school system and JMU ride for free. Transfers are free and 25-coupon books can be purchased at a discount. You must have exact change when paying a fare in cash.

Harrisonburg Utility Companies

  • Harrisonburg Electric Company
  • Columbia Gas for natural gas  and fuel oil service
  • AmeriGas for propane gas service
  • Custer C L Inc, Quarles Energy Services, and Rockingham Petroleum Cooperative provide fuel oil.
  • To set up water and sewer service, stop by the billing office at 2155 Beery Road to make a deposit. You’ll need a photo ID and a lease, deed, or HUD settlement.
  • Trash pickup operates on an “all in one” system for waste and recyclables. Learn more about the program and schedule here.
  • Internet and cable TV services are available from Comcast and Verizon.

Parks and Recreation

Harrisonburg Parks and Recreation

Harrisonburg residents enjoy many city parks and playgrounds including A Dream Come True Playground, Bluestone Trail, Smithland Dog Park, Eastover Tennis Courts, Ramblewood Athletic Complex, Welcome Home Garden, and Westover Skate Park. There is also a senior center, community activities center, and swimming program. Local sports teams, leagues, and clubs are available for both kids and adults. And beyond city limits you’ll find the Massanutten Ski Resort, Civil War Trails, and Shenandoah Valley Wine Trail. If you desire an active, outdoors lifestyle, Harrisonburg is a great place to live.

Visit the Rockingham County Parks & Rec website for information on facilities across the county, as well as afterschool programs, summer day camps, local events, and activities for children and adults.

Major Attractions in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County

From a farmer’s market to art galleries, libraries, museums, and theaters, Harrisonburg has a lot to offer arts aficionados. There’s also a thriving culinary scene in downtown Harrisonburg and many festivals throughout the year celebrating culture, holidays, food, pets, charities, and more. If you want the excitement of city life without the hassles of a big city, a smaller college town like Harrisonburg is an ideal place to live. Here are some highlights:

Across Rockingham County, major attractions include:

Local Media and News Outlets

Harrisonburg and Rockingham County Libraries

Massanutten Regional Library, located at 174 S. Main Street in Harrisonburg, offers a full menu of activities, services, and events for children and adults. It serves residents of Harrisonburg, as well as Rockingham and Page Counties, with seven county-wide locations.

Banking You Love From People Who Care.

Harrisonburg Banks

There’s so much to do and remember during the moving process. Check one thing off your to-do list right now by choosing F&M Bank as your financial services resource in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County. If you need a mortgage to purchase a new home in the Harrisonburg area, a loan to cover some of your relocation expenses, or simply a high interest checking or savings account, F&M is here for your with local friendly service and a long history as a Shenandoah Valley community bank.

Call or visit our branch locations in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County for all your banking needs:

2030 Legacy Lane, Harrisonburg (Coffman’s Corner) > View Branch Details

80 Cross Keys Road, Harrisonburg (Crossroads) > View Branch Details

Bridgewater > View Branch Details

Broadway> View Branch Details

Elkton > View Branch Details

Grottoes

Timberville > View Branch Details

Christmas Events at F&M Bank

Join us for a holiday event this December!

Join us for a holiday-themed event this December at the following branches:

Friday, December 8th, 3 to 5 PM

Timberville – 205 S. Main Street
Pictures with Santa and refreshments

Crossroads (Harrisonburg) –  80 Cross Keys Road
Frosty the Snowman, Sammy the Squirrel, face painting, a photo booth, ornament, sugar cookie and Santa hat decorating, and refreshments

Friday, December 15th, 3:30 to 5 PM

Craigsville – 125 W. Craig Street
Pictures with Santa, crafts, and door prizes. Also, celebrating our 2 year anniversary! Stop by all day for refreshments.

Friday, December 22nd

Elkton – 127 W. Rockingham Street
Customer Appreciation Day – Save the date, more info to come!

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Guide To Harrisonburg Sports Teams, Leagues, And Clubs For Kids And Adults

Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley region is a beautiful place to enjoy outdoor activities. So it’s no surprise that Harrisonburg is a hotbed of sports activities. Enjoy our comprehensive guide to area sports!

Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley region is a beautiful place to enjoy outdoor activities. So it’s no surprise that Harrisonburg is a hotbed of sports activities. From the Recreation Department’s many Harrisonburg youth sports programs, adult sports leagues, and other physical activities; to golf courses that are open to the public for lessons and tee times; and the many small businesses–gyms, martial arts studios, shooting ranges–that contribute to the vibrancy and health of our city; Harrisonburg has something for everyone and plenty of options for families that want to have fun and exercise together. And with James Madison University and other local colleges nearby, there are many good teams to watch and root for.

F&M Bank is a proud community bank with locations across the Shenandoah Valley including six in Harrisonburg and the surrounding Rockingham County. We hope you enjoy our guide to Harrisonburg’s recreational sports activities. Browse local options and class offerings and mark your calendar for registration dates, important game days, and one-time athletic clinics or activities.

Harrisonburg Youth Sports Programs

Harrionsburg Youth Sports

Rockingham County Parks & Recreation offers teams and classes in youth athletics, dance, karate, gymnastics and other activities. In addition to the annual programs listed below, check out the current Activities Guide for an eclectic and comprehensive range of classes in subjects ranging from lacrosse clinics and roller/in-line skate lessons to tae kwon do, FlingGolf, regular golf clinics, and archery tag.

Tackle Football

Eligibility: Eight- and nine-year-olds weighing at least 60 lbs play in the “B” division. Kids ages 10 through 12, including 13-year-olds in the seventh grade, play in the “A division.” Further restrictions apply to “B” division players over 110 lbs and “A” children over 135 lbs, who must play on the line.

Season: Begins in mid-August with practices three times/week. Games begin in mid-September, when practices are cut to twice a week. Tackle football ends in mid to late October.

Location: Practices and games take place throughout Rockingham county.

Uniform: Helmet and shoulder pads are available during the season and must be returned after your child is done playing. The cost of the game jersey (and equipment use) is included in the $45 fee.

Other requirements: Parent/guardian must sign a permission form that also verifies child’s age. (No physicals or birth certificates required.)

Flag Football

Eligibility: All children between ages six and 13. Players are divided into groups according to age range: six- and seven year-olds, eight-10 years, and 11-13 years.

Season: Late August through mid-October. Games and practices are held twice a week: once on a weeknight (the day varies) and Saturday mornings.

Location: TA, Broadway and Spotswood areas

Uniform: A t-shirt jersey is included with the $35 fee.

Basketball

Eligibility: All children between ages five-18. Players are divided by age, gender, and school district. The five- and six-year-old age group is clinic only. Other groups are seven/eight, nine/ten, 11-13, and 14-18. Players in the oldest group must still be enrolled in high school.

Season: Boys’ basketball runs from early January-late February. The girls’ season is late October-mid-December. Practices and games are held on one or two weeknights (the exact day varies) and Saturdays.

Uniform: A t-shirt jersey is included with the $35 fee.

Cheerleading

Eligibility: Ages six through nine are assigned to the “B” squad. 10-13-year-olds make up the “A” squad.

Season: Follows the football season of mid-August through October. Cheerleaders practice twice a week throughout the season and perform on Saturday mornings once games begin.

Location: Throughout Rockingham county

Uniform: The new uniform fee is $50. Previously purchased or secondhand RCPR cheer uniforms are acceptable. Uniform fitting occurs on-site during registration.

Other requirements: $30 registration fee

Wrestling Clinics

Eligibility: Kindergarten through Eighth grade

Season: Check the current activities guide for dates and locations

Co-ed Volleyball Clinics

Eligibility: Ages five through 13

Season: Check the current activities guide for dates and locations

Co-Ed Soccer

Register your child for co-ed soccer online at Shenandoah Valley United Soccer or by calling them at (540) 383-6341.

Adult Sports

Harrisonburg Adult Sports Leagues

The fun doesn’t stop in childhood. Harrisonburg’s Recreation Department provides activities and programs for adults and seniors including fitness classes, open gym basketball, wiffle ball tournaments, bubble soccer, pickleball open gym, self-defense, Zumba, arts and crafts, educational classes, trips, and more. Here are the options for Harrisonburg adult sports leagues:

  • Men’s Basketball: Begins in January (register in December). Games are played in Broadway.
  • Men’s Softball: Summer session begins in May with April registration. To play in the fall (starting in August), register in July. Games are played in Broadway or West Rockingham.
  • Mixed Softball: Summer session begins in May with April registration. To play in the fall (starting in August), register in July. Games are played at West Rockingham.
  • Flag Football: Spring league begins in March (register in January). Fall league starts in September (register in July). Games are played in Grottoes.
  • Women’s Volleyball: Spring league begins in March (register in January). Fall league starts in October (register in August). Games are played at Wilbur Pence or Montevideo Middle Schools.
  • Mixed Volleyball: Begins in January (register in November). Games are played at Wilbur Pence Middle School.
  • Kickball: Summer league begins in May (register in March). Fall league starts in August (register in June). Games are played at West Rockingham.
  • Dodgeball: Begins in October (register in August). Games are played at Mt. View Elementary School.

Where to play golf in Harrisonburg

Harrisonburg Golf Courses

If you enjoy the fresh air and friendly environment of a golf course, there are lots of great choices in Harrisonburg. These four area establishments are all open to the public with membership options, one-time tee time reservations, and lessons for adults and kids.

Swimming in Harrisonburg

Harrisonburg Aquatic Clubs

Aquatic exercise is great for your health and saves you from impact stress to your joints. Whether you’re new to swimming or looking for a team, you’ve got a few different options in Harrisonburg.

  • VAST Gators and Virginia Gators are competitive year-round swim teams.
  • The Westover Waves are a summer recreational swim team for kids ages five-18.
  • James Madison’s UREC pool offers private and group swimming lessons for kids as young as three up to adults.
  • Swimming lessons are also offered through the Recreation Department. Check the current activity guide for availability.

Shooting Ranges

Shooting ranges in Harrisonburg

If shooting is your hobby of choice, you can enjoy target practice or sporting clays at these Harrisonburg businesses.

  • The Gun Range offers hourly rates, memberships, and various training classes.
  • Flying Rabbit Sporting Clays is a sporting clays range offering games, instruction, and gun sales and rentals.

Boxing and Martial Arts

Boxing and Martial Arts in Harrisonburg

From classic karate to trendy Muay Thai, Harrisonburg has many high-quality martial arts gyms.

Harrisonburg Gyms and Fitness Clubs

Gyms & Fitness Clubs in Harrisonburg, VA

What if you like to do a little bit of everything? Check out these Harrisonburg gyms and fitness clubs, where you’ll find standard exercise equipment and weight machines, as well as on-site childcare and group fitness classes in some gyms.

Root for your local high school and college teams

Harrisonburg Local Sports Teams

Harrisonburg has a thriving local athletic community including state and county baseball leagues, college athletic programs, and plenty of other local sporting events.

  • Harrisonburg High School, home of the Blue Streaks
  • James Madison University Dukes
  • Bridgewater College Eagles
  • Eastern Mennonite University Royals
  • Harrisonburg Turks
  • Rockingham County Baseball League
  • Valley Baseball League

Active communities are happy and healthy communities.

Harrisonburg's Local Bank

As a community bank for more than a century, F&M Bank is committed to supporting healthy and thriving towns where our employees and customers live and work. We understand that there are many ways to measure good health, from a strong economy to the physical fitness of the people living there. We also love coming together to root for the home team! Whether you’re new to Harrisonburg (check out our Harrisonburg relocation guide!) or a longtime resident considering a new athletic hobby, learn more about our various business and personal checking options. We have all the services you need to stay active in work and leisure.

Call or visit our two branch locations in Harrisonburg for all your banking needs:

Take the Stress Out of Your Holidays

The holidays are supposed to be a relaxing time spent with family and friends reflecting on the current year and looking ahead to the next. However, for most Americans, the holidays invoke feelings of stress and fatigue. According to a poll conducted by the American Psychological Association, nearly a quarter of Americans report feeling extreme stress during the holiday season, and 45% of Americans would prefer to skip Christmas. But, that doesn’t have to be the case. We can’t guarantee a white Christmas, but with proper planning and budgeting, you can make your holiday season the most wonderful time of the year.

The holidays are supposed to be a relaxing time spent with family and friends reflecting on the current year and looking ahead to the next. However, for most Americans, the holidays invoke feelings of stress and fatigue. According to a poll conducted by the American Psychological Association, nearly a quarter of Americans report feeling extreme stress during the holiday season, and 45% of Americans would prefer to skip Christmas. But, that doesn’t have to be the case. We can’t guarantee a white Christmas, but with proper planning and budgeting, you can make your holiday season the most wonderful time of the year. Here are some tips!

Keep it Basic

Your holiday dinner doesn’t have to consist of a cranberry stuffed Cornish game hen and 12 side dishes to turn heads. In our social media driven world, you may look to Pinterest and Facebook for inspiration, but don’t let those platforms set the standard for what is normal. If you want to try a fancy dish, that’s great!

But, if you don’t want to cook a spread suitable for Country Living Magazine, just stick to the basics. You’re guaranteed to save money on groceries, plus, it’s less stressful! And, once you put the essentials on your plate – turkey, potatoes, stuffing, rolls, and green beans – who has room for more?

Before roasting an entire turkey, take a look at your guest list. Is a whole bird really necessary? That’s a lot of food (and a lot of work). Consider serving just turkey breast instead! It cuts down on leftovers, and it’s more affordable.

Coupons and Savings Apps

Coupons are your friend! Often, you can find lots of great deals in the Saturday paper. Try browsing the weekly circulars online to look for sales on items you need. Also, try loading digital coupons to your store discount cards!

There are great savings apps out there as well! Jessica Hartman, Customer Service Representative at our Coffman’s Corner branch, offers the following tip: “I try to pair sales up with my Ibotta and Checkout 51 apps. If you watch the sales, you can purchase a turkey fairly cheap – I ended up getting one for $0.59/lb last year.”

Also, don’t be afraid to ask for help. If you are hosting the holiday dinner at your home, ask family and friends to bring a side dish or dessert. Divide out the responsibility so you’re not drained, both physically and financially.

Plan Ahead and Budget

Spending money on gifts is the most stressful part of the holiday season, according to the APA study. Don’t let it be! Begin planning for the holiday season early in the year. Katie Fulk, Head Teller at our Bridgewater Branch, says, “Some of the girls here like to buy Christmas gifts throughout the year. This helps financially because the cost of gifts can be spread from month to month, and then things are not as overwhelming at Christmas time. Also, if you save $20 a week, you end up with over $1,000.00 in a years’ time of saving.”

Looking for a great way to save throughout the year? Open a Christmas Club! The concept is that customers deposit a certain amount of money each week into a special savings account. Then, receive the money back near year-end for Christmas shopping. It’s a great way to put aside a small amount of money each week lessening the financial burden in December.

Save Money While Shopping

It might be too late to start saving for Christmas this year, but you still have options to save! Black Friday offers a variety of deals. If you hate fighting the crowds, most deals are also offered online, so stay home in the comfort of your pajamas and shop! Cyber Monday also offers great savings!

Charles Halterman, Branch Specialist at our Myers Corner location suggests a Chinese gift exchange to cut down on costs. He says, “My family and I did a Chinese gift exchange one year for the adults. Everyone buys one gift and wraps it. Then, you put numbers in a bowl for however many people are participating. Everyone draws a number, and Number One chooses a gift. Then, Number 2 can steal Number 1’s gift or choose a new gift…and so on, and so on. In the end, everyone gets one gift, you have fun playing a game with friends and family, and everyone saves money!”

Gifts to Please Anyone

Finally, we all have that family member who won’t make a Christmas gift suggestion. If you find yourself not needing anything, consider asking friends and family to make a donation to a charity you support instead of receiving another pack of socks you don’t need (or want). Kristen Huffman, Customer Service Representative at our Craigsville Branch does this every year. She says, “I ask family to send money to a charitable organization instead of buying me gifts. I don’t really need anything especially something that will just clutter up my house even more. Each year my husband gives money to World Vision as my Christmas present.”

Gift cards are also a great option for those family members without a Christmas list. Did you know you can purchase Visa gift cards at any F&M Bank Branch location? Avoid the long lines at Walmart, and pick up a Visa gift card next time you’re making a banking transaction.

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Local History Comes to Life through Research at Plains District Memorial Museum

Outside the front doors of F&M Bank Timberville, you’ll find a plaque honoring 10 local World War II veterans. Behind each name etched in stone, lies a story – family, friends, occupations, and hobbies left behind for service when each man answered the call of duty. This summer, our interns, Josh Lasam and Adam Varner, spent time at the Plains District Memorial Museum researching the 10 veterans to honor their service and bring their stories to life. Below, you’ll find the rich history of Paul Andes, Frank H. Driver Jr., Frank (Bud) F. Hoover, Orville Lee Knupp, Joseph E. Strickler III, William (Bill) Luther Crider, Lawrence (Pete) Holsinger, Paul Orville Neff, Robert G. Knupp Jr., and Harry Franklin Thompson – all WWII veterans native to the Timberville area.

“On this Veterans Day, let us remember the service of our veterans, and let us

renew our national promise to fulfill our sacred obligations to our veterans and their

families who have sacrificed so much so that we can live free.” – Dave Lipinski

We will never be able to express with words the gratitude we feel towards those who, past or present, bravely bear the nation’s cause. Our freedom is placed on your shoulders, and you have carried the weight triumphantly. It is our duty to honor those who have bravely defended the stars and stripes. Thank you, veterans, for sacrificing so much that we may remain the “home of the free because of the brave”.  -Directors, Officers, and Staff of F&M Bank

TIMBERVILLE, VA — Outside the front doors of F&M Bank Timberville, you’ll find a plaque honoring 10 local World War II veterans. Behind each name etched in stone, lies a story – family, friends, occupations, and hobbies left behind for service when each man answered the call of duty.

This summer, our interns, Josh Lasam and Adam Varner, spent time at the Plains District Memorial Museum researching the 10 veterans to honor their service and bring their stories to life. Below, you’ll find the rich history of Paul Andes, Frank H. Driver Jr., Frank (Bud) F. Hoover, Orville Lee Knupp, Joseph E. Strickler III, William (Bill) Luther Crider, Lawrence (Pete) Holsinger, Paul Orville Neff, Robert G. Knupp Jr., and Harry Franklin Thompson – all WWII veterans native to the Timberville area.

Paul Andes

Paul Andes was born near Timberville on Sept. 20, 1916. Private Andes was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Emmanuel Andes. He was employed by the American Express Co. at their Washington terminal for the seven years prior to being inducted into the Army. He was inducted on December 31, 1943 and then transferred overseas in June of 1944. Paul married Miss Lettie Romer on April 25, 1937. They had two children, Minnie and Ralph. Paul was a member of the Church of the Brethren. He was killed in action on a mission to take San Isidro, Leyte, Philippine Islands. His squad was moving up to take high ground before they were hit by a barrage of rifle fire. Paul was found after the battle. He is buried in the U.S. Armed Forces Cemetery #1, Carigara, Leyte, P.I., grave #302. He died on December 28, 1944. Paul was described by the Captain of the 34th Infantry, Donald Burr, as being a “fine soldier and a good friend, well-liked by all.”

Frank H. Driver Jr.

Frank Driver Jr. was born on January 4th, 1919, to Frank and Sarah Driver. He had five older siblings: Alen, Pauline, Anna, Margurite, and Carroll. After attending Massanutten Military Academy, Frank enlisted in the Army Air Corps in August 1940 and took his basic training at Camp Eustis. He became part of an artillery-anti-aircraft unit that was sent to the Philippines where he was stationed at Clark Field, 40 miles from Manila. He was a part of the 28th Bomber Squadron, 19th Bomber group. During the war, he was taken prisoner in May of 1942. He was captured from the Philippines and transferred to Osaka, Japan. His family received a telegram from the office of the Provost Marshal General saying that a transcription of a Japanese propaganda broadcast from their son had been intercepted. The message read, “Dear Folks, I am getting along fine. And the food and treatment are very good. I hope that this war will end soon, so that I can come home. Let me know how you all are, and the local news.” By the time that the telegram reached his family, he had passed away. Frank died in the prison camp around late March 1945.

Frank (Bud) F. Hoover

Frank (Bud) F. Hooever was born in Timberville on July 17, 1925. He was a son of Mrs. Ruby Brill Hoover and the late Saylor Hoover. His real name is Frank, but was known by friends and family as Bud. He graduated from Timberville High School in 1942. He enlisted on July 5th,1944 in Richmond, VA, while attending the Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg, VA. At Tech, he was an engineering student who had been overseas since September of 1944. He trained at Fort Benning Georgia and the University of Pennsylvania. He was then a Sergeant with General Patton’s Third Army. He deployed to England for 3 weeks, then landed in France in early September, 1944. His unit was in a heavily wooded area, met heavy barrage and Bud was killed in action on November 16th, 1944 in Waippy, France and is buried in the U.S. cemetery in Limey, France. He was awarded the Good Conduct Medal and the Purple Heart. Bud was described as a young man who was popular with both young and old and was very thoughtful of others. He made many friends wherever he went during his short life. His mother was a grade school teacher in Timberville. His brother, John, attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He had two sisters, Mary Lou and Eleanor. Eleanor attended Bridgewater College.

Orville Lee Knupp

Orville Lee Knupp was the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Knupp of Timberville. He had two sisters and two brothers.  He attended Timberville High School and was a member of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in the community of Concord. He entered the service on September 21, 1942, where he received his basic training at Fort McClellan, Alabama, and Camp Burtner, North Carolina. He left the U.S. in July 1943, where he participated in the invasion of Kiska in the Aleutians. After spending a year in the Hawaiian Islands, he took part in the invasion of Leyte. He was killed in action on Camotes in the Philippines on January 22, 1945 at just 24 years old. Orville’s family received his Purple Heart, the American Legion Gold Star Citation, and a certificate of gratitude bearing the seal of the United States and the signature of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Joseph E. Strickler III

Joe and his twin brother James (Jim) were born on April 26, 1925. They were the second and third of eight children born to Edgar W. Strickler, Sr. and Zella (Norman) Strickler of Timberville. They lived along with their parents and siblings in the old Philip Strickler home place located near the North Fork of the Shenandoah River, which is just behind the Mutual Cold Storage building. As children, they enjoyed life near the river swimming, fishing, boating, and frog hunting with their father. They also enjoyed roller skating on the concrete at the Cold Storage Building. One of Joe’s favorite activities was setting trap lines along the river bank. Joe attended Timberville High School. He was also a member of the Timberville Church of the Brethren. Joe enlisted into the U.S. Army at 18, in February of 1943 at Fort George G. Meade, in Maryland. Joe was sent to an army base in California for basic training, then deployed to the Pacific thereafter for service in the 6th Army Division. Joe was part of one of the U.S. troops that invaded the island of Leyte in the Philippines, as it was an attempt to isolate Japan from valuable supplies of oil. The Battle destroyed the effectiveness of the Japanese Navy for the remainder of the war. In November of 1944, Joe was one of 10,000 American troops who made an amphibious landing on the island of Mindoro, the seventh largest island in the Philippine chain. The Japanese were outnumbered and defeated in three days. He then invaded Okinawa Island. The battle lasted 82 days under extraordinarily difficult conditions. Joseph E. Strickler was found wounded. Doctors then determined that fragments from the mortar shell wounds in his side were too close to his heart to be removed. After several weeks in the hospital, he was released and transferred from the Infantry to the 623rd Military Police Company stationed in Hawaii. He died on December 25th, 1945 as the result of a traffic accident. He was just 20 years old. The War Department gave Joe’s family permission to move his remains back home on October 10, 1947. His body rests in the Timberville Church of the Brethren Cemetery. In recognition of his military service, the War Department presented his family with a Purple Heart. Joe’s commanding officer described him as “never seeing an individual in our organization who was more liked and looked up to as a soldier and a man than Strickler.”

William Luther (Bill) Crider

William (Bill) Crider of Fulks Run was drafted into the US Army on July 7, 1941. After taking basic infantry training at Camp Wheeler in Georgia, he was assigned to the 9th Infantry Division as a rifleman and underwent specialized training in amphibious landings at Fort Bragg, NC. He shipped out in fall of 1942 and took part in an amphibious landing at Algiers, Algeria, in North Africa in America’s first offensive action in WWII. He survived this action and participated in an amphibious landing at Licenta, Sicily on July 9, 1943. Later in ’43 he was reassigned to Co. B, 15th Regt., 3rd Div., where he was in the same company as Audie Murphy, who became America’s most highly decorated soldier. Crider was wounded on November 3, 1943, just north of Presenzano, Italy while moving along Highway 6, but rejoined his company a few weeks later. On January 22, 1944, his company made an amphibious landing at Anzio, Italy to stabilize the beachhead there. The next few months marked some of the most vicious fighting of the war, including 3 weeks of living in foxholes, coming out only briefly at night and enduring unending artillery fire, bombing by German aircraft and probing German patrols. On May 23, 1944, Co. B was an integral part of the allied breakout at Cisterna, Italy. Bill’s company endured very heavy losses but he survived. His entire division then began moving virtually unopposed to Rome. On May 26, 1944, the company left an overnight bivouac at Cori, Italy and were marching along the Via Roma (Rome Road) about a mile west of Cori when they were mistakenly attacked by fire US P40 warplanes. 16 regiment members died, including Crider, and 80 were wounded. Crider was buried in Nettuno Cemetery, near Anzio. On June 26, 1948, he was reburied in Staunton National Cemetery, where his then 5 year old daughter, Blanche Ann Crider, whom he never met, was finally united with her father.

Lawrence M. Holsinger

Lawrence M. ‘Pete’ Holsinger was drafted and left his home in Timberville on December 14, 1942, for basic training in Ft. McClellan, Alabama. He was a 26-year-old truck driver. He completed basic training in February 1943 and was attached to a motorized unit until he volunteered for the paratroops in March of ’43. Jump school at Ft. Bragg, NC followed and he was shipped out of New York City to French Morocco, North Africa by mid-April 1943. On July 9, 1943, the 82nd flew from their base in Tunisia and dropped on the Sicilian Mainland where heavy fighting lasted about 10 days. Later, in November of ’43, the entire division sailed to Northern Ireland and encamped there a month and a half before moving to England. In England, they settled at various camps in Leicester and Nottingham for the next three months where they trained for the Normandy Invasion in C-47’s and gliders over the English Country side. The division moved to various airfields in England in preparation for the invasion and on June 6, 1944, Holsinger departed Ramsbury Airfield in a Horsa glider towed by a C-47 with a destination of Landing Zone “O” in Normandy. The glider crashed 4:20AM near Hiesville, Normandy killing eight troopers and Holsinger. He was buried in a temporary cemetery at Blosville the following day and remained there until April 1946 when his remains were returned to Timberville. He was buried in the Timberville Church of the Brethren Cemetery on April 19, 1946.

Paul Orville Neff

Paul Orville “Charlie” Neff was born and raised on North Mountain Road near Cootes Store, VA. He worked as a sheet metal fabricator in Broadway before being drafted in May of 1941. He was initially sent to Camp Lee, VA and then to Ft. Meade, Maryland, where he received 13 weeks of basic training. He was then was assigned to Company G, 116th Regiment, 29th Division for the balance of his life. The division participated in large scale war games with other outfits in North Carolina until the division was deployed along the east coast to provide security after the US entered the war in December 1941. Neff himself patrolled southern VA and northern NC coastal facilities. The 29th was dispatched to Camp Kilmer, New Jersey and then to New York City where they departed on September 26, 1942, and sailed to Scotland arriving on October 5th. The division moved to Tidsworth, England and began a year and a half of training in preparation for the invasion of Europe. On June 4, 1944, the 29th boarded ship and departed for the coast of Normandy. It was there on the morning of June 6th that Neff died on Omaha Beach.  Neff was declared ‘missing in action’ even though he had already been buried, and on September 1, 1944, his family was notified that he had indeed been killed in action. He was interred in a temporary cemetery at Normandy until December 1947, when he was returned to Virginia and buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Robert G. Knupp Jr.

Robert G. “Junie” Knupp Jr. was born in the community of Hupp, or Concord, and grew up in the Timberville area. He married at 21 and moved to Washington DC where he worked as a mechanic for Associated Transport Co. He was inducted at Ft. Meade, Maryland on January 13th, 1944 and was quickly sent to Camp Croft, South Carolina for infantry training. His first son was born in March of ’44 but only lived a few weeks. Knupp was sent to England and arrived August 1st, 1944. He subsequently caught up with the invasion forces and entered France at St. Lo where he saw limited action. Later, Knupp’s regiment captured the port city of Brest, France, and entered Germany with the advancing Allied forces. Knupp was killed in action near Wurselon, Germany on October 14, 1944. He was first reported missing in action 2 weeks prior to his reported death date. In May of ’45, Robert’s body was returned for burial at St. Paul’s. His burial service commenced one day after that of his first cousin, Lawrence Holsinger, who was killed in Normandy on D-Day.

Harry Franklin Thompson

Harry F. Thompson was born on August 13, 1916, in Minnesota and moved to Rockingham County in his youth where he lived with his grandparents about 2 miles west of Timberville in George Bowers Orchard. As he grew up, he attended elementary school through the seventh grade and worked in the orchards. The 1940 census states he was living with his father and mother-in-law, along with his wife Fleta in Shenandoah County, close to Orkney. Harry enlisted in the Army on February 25, 1941, in Baltimore. Harry was reported missing in action on November 8, 1942, and was declared dead on November 8, 1943. Information is not available regarding where Harry was killed or buried. He is memorialized at the Tablets of the Missing at the North Africa American Cemetery in Carthage, Tunisia.

About F&M Bank

F&M Bank is a locally owned community bank serving the Shenandoah Valley with 13 full-service branches, a network of ATMs, and a wide variety of financial services. Both individuals and businesses find the organization’s local decision-making, and up-to-date technology provide the kind of responsive, knowledgeable, and reliable service that only a progressive community bank can. F&M Bank has grown to over $750 million in assets with over 160 full and part-time employees. Its conservative approach to finances and sound investments, along with excellent customer service, has made F&M Bank profitable and continues to pave the way for a bright future.

About Plains District Memorial Museum

Plains District Memorial Museum was founded in 1998 with Timberville Mayor Mac McCauley’s dream to preserve local heritage and bring the communities of the Plains District together. The first displays were donated artifacts from individuals and businesses and included an 1880s band wagon, antique fire truck, and old F&M Bank calendars. These collections have expanded over the years to include information and artifacts from Athlone, Criders, Mauzy, Bergton, Daphna, Mayland, Broadway, Fulks Run, Mechanicsville, Brocks Gap, Hupp, Tenth Legion, Cootes Store, Lacy Spring, and Timberville. The museum is now located at 176 N. Main Street, Timberville.

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F&M Bank Corp. Announces Third Quarter Earnings and Dividend Increase

F & M Bank Corp. (OTCQX: FMBM), parent company of Farmers & Merchants Bank, announces its financial results for the quarter ending September 30, 2017.

F & M Bank Corp. (OTCQX: FMBM), parent company of Farmers & Merchants Bank, announces its financial results for the quarter ending September 30, 2017.

Selected highlights for the quarter include:

  • Net income of $2.55;
  • Net interest margin of 4.48%;
  • Net interest income increased $413,000;
  • Return on Average Assets of 1.34%;

Dean Withers, President and CEO, commented “We are pleased to announce third quarter earnings of $2.55 million, which is in line with the same period last year.  Growth in loans held for investment totaled $16.6 million for the third quarter of 2017 and $41.9 million compared to the same period last year.  Our net interest margin at 4.48% continues to be driven by our strong loan to asset ratio.  Non-performing assets are relatively stable versus second quarter and have decreased $560,000 versus the same period in 2016.”

Withers stated, “On October 19, 2017 our Board of Directors declared a third quarter dividend of $.24 per share to common shareholders. This is an increase of $.01 over the prior quarter and $.02 over the same period last year. Based on our most recent trade price of $30.45 per share this constitutes a 3.15% yield on an annualized basis. The dividend will be paid on November 16, 2017, to shareholders of record as of November 2, 2017.”  Highlights of our financial performance are included below.

F & M Bank Corp. is an independent, locally-owned, financial holding company, offering a full range of financial services, through its subsidiary, Farmers & Merchants Bank’s thirteen banking offices in Rockingham, Shenandoah, Page and Augusta Counties, Virginia. The Bank also provides additional services through a loan production office located in Penn Laird, VA and through its subsidiaries, VBS Mortgage and VS Title, both of which are located in Harrisonburg, VA.  Additional information may be found by contacting us on the internet at www.fmbankva.com or by calling (540) 896-8941.

This press release may contain “forward-looking statements” as defined by federal securities laws, which may involve significant risks and uncertainties. These statements address issues that involve risks, uncertainties, estimates and assumptions made by management, and actual results could differ materially from the results contemplated by these forward-looking statements. Factors that could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects include, but are not limited to, changes in: interest rates, general economic conditions, legislative and regulatory policies, and a variety of other matters. Other risk factors are detailed from time to time in our Securities and Exchange Commission filings. Readers should consider these risks and uncertainties in evaluating forward-looking statements and should not place undue reliance on such statements. We undertake no obligation to update these statements following the date of this press release.

1) The net interest margin is calculated by dividing tax equivalent net interest income by total average earning assets. Tax equivalent interest income is calculated by grossing up interest income for the amounts that are nontaxable (i.e. municipal securities and loan income) then subtracting interest expense. The tax rate utilized is 34%. The Company’s net interest margin is a common measure used by the financial service industry to determine how profitable earning assets are funded. Because the Company earns nontaxable interest income from municipal loans and securities, net interest income for the ratio is calculated on a tax equivalent basis as described above.

2) The efficiency ratio is not a measurement under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The efficiency ratio is a common measure used by the financial service industry to determine operating efficiency. It is calculated by dividing non-interest expense by the sum of tax equivalent net interest income and non-interest income excluding gains and losses on the investment portfolio. The Company calculates this ratio in order to evaluate how efficiently it utilizes its operating structure to create income. An increase in the ratio from period to period indicates the Company is losing a greater percentage of its income to expenses.

Source: F & M Bank Corp.

Contact: Neil Hayslett, EVP/Chief Administrative Officer | 540-896-8941 or NHayslett@FMBankVA.com

https://www.otcmarkets.com/stock/FMBM/news/F–amp–M-Bank-Corp–Announces-Third-Quarter-Earnings-and-Dividend-Increase?id=172955&b=y

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