golocal

What Does Going Local Mean?
By going local, consumers can make a hometown investment they are proud of. The money deposited at your community bank will be reinvested in ways that drive our local economy, such as in the form of loans to local residents who want to buy a home or to small business owners who are looking to open a business, shop, or restaurant on the Main Streets of our Valley towns.

 

By going local, consumers can make a hometown investment they are proud of. The money deposited at your community bank will be reinvested in ways that drive our local economy, such as in the form of loans to local residents who want to buy a home or to small business owners who are looking to open a business, shop, or restaurant on the Main Streets of our Valley towns.

Going local helps us as a bank remain invested in our customers and helps us as all as individuals stay invested in our communities. As a small business ourselves, we only thrive when our customers and communities do the same. Taking care of you and looking out for the best interests of our neighbors has been ingrained in the way we conduct business since our own humble beginnings in 1908.

After many townspeople witnessed family fortunes disappear following the devaluation of Confederate money at the close of the Civil War, not all Timberville residents were receptive to the concept of a new bank in town. However, cautiously hopeful of a new government monetary system that would last, a few local businessmen led the way to promote an independent local bank in Timberville. With the times fostering an emerging concept of banking — a convenient place near home to safely deposit, borrow or invest money  somewhere other than in a sock or under a floorboard — the trust of our communities and local customers helped F&M bank raise the $10,000 capital needed to open its doors in 1908.

Whether located in the small towns and suburbia of the Shenandoah Valley, or in big-city neighborhoods, community banks improve America’s communities by funding nearly 60 percent of all small businesses under $1 million, and by using local dollars to help families purchase a home, buy a car, finance college and build financial security.

By driving local economies and creating local jobs, community banks are an integral part of our financial system and play a key role in our nation’s economic recovery. As many of the nation’s consumers consider switching banks, now is the perfect time to take part in the “go local” movement by joining your local community bank.
Information courtesy of:
Banking on the future : a 100-year history of Farmers & Merchants Bank, 1908-2008 (Paperback)
by Nancy Bondurant Jones (Author). Stop by your local branch for a copy!

Independent Community Bankers Association