Local Business Profile

Check out our Q&A with locally owned and operated businesses in the Valley!

We interviewed Skip Frost, Executive Agent of Integrity Insurance.

Q: When did your business open? Is it locally owned?
A: We opened in February of 2013, so we’re new, but bring over 35 years of insurance experience. We are locally owned. The business is owned by myself and two partners – Brian Showalter and Brandon Crawford. Brian and I are both from Bridgewater and Brandon is from Broadway.

Q: What types of services/products do you offer?
A: We specialize in Commercial Lines Insurance, e.g., Business owner’s policies, Commercial Property, General Liability, Worker’s Compensation, Etc.

Q: Why did you decide to open your business in the Valley?
A: We love the valley! It’s home to us and we enjoy all the valley has to offer. From a business perspective, the area has done very well in terms of business growth amidst a struggling economy. With JMU, EMU, Bridgewater College and others, there will always be a steady influx of young entrepreneurs which will continue to contribute to the economic growth of this area.

Q: Name one thing people may not know about you or your business?
A: We set ourselves apart by taking a team approach with all of our clients. Every client has the expertise of, and access to, three agents. From the quoting process through policy delivery and beyond, the Integrity Team works diligently to be sure that our clients receive the best coverage with the most affordable premiums.

Q: Just for fun, what is your favorite song?
A: Someday by Rob Thomas.

Integrity Insurance is located at 410 Neff Avenue, Suite 400, in Harrisonburg.

Find out more about this local business that serves all of Virginia by visiting their website: http://www.integritygroupva.com/ or by giving them a call: 540-433-0200.

 

Trans Tech Auto, Inc.

Trans Tech Auto, Inc.
Go Local Business Profile: Trans Tech Auto, Inc., is located at 419 Trumbo Court in Broadway, VA.

VALLEY BUSINESS PROFILE

Trans Tech Auto opened in 1985 and is owned by Kenny McKenzie of Broadway. Trans Tech provides light and heavy duty towing and recovery; roadside assistance for flat tires, as well as jump starts, and unlocking of car doors.  The business regularly provides services for off-road towing and recovery for farm machinery, and also has a full service auto repair facility for minor and majors repairs or maintenance.

As an industry, Trans Tech is accustomed to facing challenges like no two recovery incidences of a car or tractor trailer ever being the same; the challenge of clearing an accident scene as quickly as the police would like; and getting correct directions or information when taking a tow call.

Kenny’s favorite thing about doing business in the Valley is “seeing gratitude on a customer’s face when [Trans Tech] is able to help them… [like] towing them to a safe location or repairing their car.”

For more information about Trans Tech and their services, visit their website at www.transtechtowing.com.

 

golocal

What Does Going Local Mean?
By going local, consumers can make a hometown investment they are proud of. The money deposited at your community bank will be reinvested in ways that drive our local economy, such as in the form of loans to local residents who want to buy a home or to small business owners who are looking to open a business, shop, or restaurant on the Main Streets of our Valley towns.

 

By going local, consumers can make a hometown investment they are proud of. The money deposited at your community bank will be reinvested in ways that drive our local economy, such as in the form of loans to local residents who want to buy a home or to small business owners who are looking to open a business, shop, or restaurant on the Main Streets of our Valley towns.

Going local helps us as a bank remain invested in our customers and helps us as all as individuals stay invested in our communities. As a small business ourselves, we only thrive when our customers and communities do the same. Taking care of you and looking out for the best interests of our neighbors has been ingrained in the way we conduct business since our own humble beginnings in 1908.

After many townspeople witnessed family fortunes disappear following the devaluation of Confederate money at the close of the Civil War, not all Timberville residents were receptive to the concept of a new bank in town. However, cautiously hopeful of a new government monetary system that would last, a few local businessmen led the way to promote an independent local bank in Timberville. With the times fostering an emerging concept of banking — a convenient place near home to safely deposit, borrow or invest money  somewhere other than in a sock or under a floorboard — the trust of our communities and local customers helped F&M bank raise the $10,000 capital needed to open its doors in 1908.

Whether located in the small towns and suburbia of the Shenandoah Valley, or in big-city neighborhoods, community banks improve America’s communities by funding nearly 60 percent of all small businesses under $1 million, and by using local dollars to help families purchase a home, buy a car, finance college and build financial security.

By driving local economies and creating local jobs, community banks are an integral part of our financial system and play a key role in our nation’s economic recovery. As many of the nation’s consumers consider switching banks, now is the perfect time to take part in the “go local” movement by joining your local community bank.
Information courtesy of:
Banking on the future : a 100-year history of Farmers & Merchants Bank, 1908-2008 (Paperback)
by Nancy Bondurant Jones (Author). Stop by your local branch for a copy!

Independent Community Bankers Association